Ouro for Ouro’s Sake

Normally, I would discuss what is going on in the game, maybe what I am planning to come up next, but I wanted to take a break from all that for this week, as I really wanted to give a shout out to one of my players and long-time friends.

Ouro (short for Ouroboros I), as been a good friend to me for many years online, and we have played many games together. We first met back in 2000, when we both took an active part in the development of the Unofficial Legend of Zelda Roleplaying Game. A friendship quickly grew from our shared passions and crazy projects in all things geeky. This was why Ouro was my go to when I started up DVOID Systems. This short-lived professional venture helped us expand our creative juices, but demonstrated that we really weren’t cut out for business.

Nevertheless, my long-time online friendship with Ouro would be fairly constant in my life, and it was no surprise that I would talk about him with the other important people in my life, who weren’t online. This inevitably included my partner, Sian, whom I have not only been with for five years, but have also known for twenty years as well. It’s strange to think of how many of my friends know Ouro, but only as Ouro…

This game came about because I really wanted to run a game, and after various failed attempts at games online in the past, for various reasons, only Ouro and Sian were reliable and willing enough to take part. A game with two players can cause issues, some of which I have discussed over these posts, but with their help and willingness, we have been playing for over a year now (despite interruptions), and they have taken on several roles through several adventures.

A key feature to these games, and the recaps we have afterwards, is Ouro himself. Ouro likes to draw, and has a number of artistic projects on the go on places like DeviantArt. Over time, and with some slight encouragement from myself, he has established his own comic-book style in his work. He draws for fun, and this is seen in his artwork.

During this campaign, Ouro has taken to drawing aspects of our game, as he is inspired. Sometimes it might be a funny scene, others it might be a new take on a player character or monster. No matter what, it seems like even the roughest of Ouro’s sketches gets murmurs of appreciation from Sian and myself, as it adds an extra layer of enjoyment to the whole gaming experience.

It’s because of this, that I would like to give a shout out to Ouro and his artwork here. I have a folder of his art, and often use it on this blog, especially during session recaps. You can find more of his work here at DeviantArt.

In the meantime, thank you Ouro for your fun, support, and artwork, and I hope that 2020 will bring you even more happiness and friendship. May we game together for many further years to come!

We’re Off on an Minotaur Hunt – Wrath of the Minotaur Session 1

Following a brief hiatus to resolve some technical issues (new headsets, yeay!) with our game, the intrepid explorers of the Ruined Tower finally returned the the Patriarch to see if the books they brought back contained any important information.

The Patrician welcomed them in with enthusiasm, as his study was covered in all sorts of papers, maps, and other books and scrolls. The Patriarch seemed to have had a busy few days, but was extremely excited to announce that he had made a major breakthrough with his research into the history of the Vale.

The Patriarch gave the group a brief history of the Vale, detailing the role of Alaxus, the fabled Minotaur Mage that once ruled the region. He was called the Minotaur Mage, not because he was a Minotaur himself, but rather he used his magics to enslave Minotaurs as his servitors and enforcers. The Minotaur Mage used a bull’s head for his symbol, and this was the symbol that was found on the Ruined Tower, one of the Minotaur Mage’s many towers that once helped him control this region.

The Patriarch quickly revealed why he called for the heroes once again. It turns out that thanks to their exploration of the Ruined Tower and recovery of valuable books and scrolls, the Patriarch had finally discovered the location of Alaxus’ Tomb, hidden in the east of the Vale. It was rumoured to be the final resting of the famous mage, with his followers having spirited him away after a conclusive battle with a long forgotten hero that ended the Minotaur Mage’s reign over the Vale. Thus, the party’s goal was simple, they were to find and explore the Tomb, and report back with anything they find.

The New Guys

The Patriarch stated that he couldn’t spare any of the guards in town, but that a new bunch of adventures that he had been mentoring had just finished their training, and might be able to help them with your task. With that, Patriarch brought in and introduced Michifer, Sunblayze, Thordar, and Peregrine.

Michifer was a Cleric of the Church of the Holy Defender. A new initiate, he had been trained under the Patriarch directly as part of his studies. Peregrine was a Paladin of the Church of the Holy Defender, a new recruit to the military order of the church, who had also been trained under the Patriarch with regards to his holy duties. Sunblayze, an Elf maiden, was a Spellsword who had recently finished her apprenticeship with the Patriarch. Finally, there was Thordar – a Dwarf who had been apprenticing under the town guard of Haven.

The Patriarch suggested that the group pool their resources and prepare for an expedition to the Tomb of Alaxus. However, as a precaution, he suggested that a contingent of the party remained behind to help protect Haven should anything arise. The dangers of the Vale seemed to be increasing in recent days, and whilst the guard could protect the town, they would be unsuitable for protecting the rest of the region.

With this, the group departed the Patriarch’s study  with the new recruits, and prepared for their expedition. Between them, it was decided that Elanna and Thaddeus would explore the tomb with Michifer and Thordar, whilst Darkblade, Niles, Sunblayze, and Peregrine would remain behind to protect Haven and the Vale. The neccessary supplies were bought, including a mule to carry any treasure recovered from the Tomb.

When the adventurers were ready, including having named their Mule, which Thordar decided to call “Berliner” for some reason, the party of Elanna, Thaddeus, Michifer, and Thordar set off with their map to the location of the Tomb of Alaxus. The journey took three uneventful days following a stream up into the mountains to the east of the Vale.

Finding the Tomb of Alaxus

They arrived on the supposed site of the Tomb early in the morning, and entered a clearing besides a large cave in the mountainside. The cave served as a local camping site for travelling shepherds in the Vale, who would often travel with their flocks across the mountains to richer meadows for grazing in the north of the valley.

The party came across one such shepherd that morning, who had just broken up camp in the cave, and was about to release his goats from a makeshift pen formed from an improvised barricade of branches and bushes placed in the back of the cave. Wary at first, the shepherd pointed a loaded crossbow at the party, inquiring as to what they were doing there. The party quickly defused the situation, revealing that they were looking for Alaxus’ Tomb.

The shepherd introduced himself as Macques (pronounced “Max”), and stated that he wasn’t interested in such nonsense, as he was focused on protecting his herd from the Kobolds seen in the region. However, having been satisfied that the party had no intention of robbing him, Macques asked the party to assist him in taking down the barricade, and after they did so, the shepherd left with his flock.

Alone in the cave, the party explored the area. Although the cave seemed empty, Thordar quickly spotted a depression in the back wall, which was revealed to be the symbol of a bull’s head once the moss was cleared up. Two bluer pieces of granite made up the eyes, and when they were pressed, the entire slab moved upwards… about three inches. There was a dark passageway beyond, and with a concerted effort, the party forced the door the rest of the way to gain access to what was presumably the Tomb of Alaxus.

The party decided to make final preparations, including replacing the makeshift barricade across the back of the cavern behind them, so as to hide the new entrance from casual discovery, and to serve as a form of protection for Berliner. The passageway went forwards about thirty feet, up to wooden door ahead of them. Thaddeus lit a torch, having learnt from the Ruined Tower, as the party braved themselves to press ahead… next session.

Note: The shopping expedition actually took most of the session, but I have skipped it for the recap, since I am not sure how fun it would be to read. It was enjoyable, as my players considered what they might need for an expedition into the Tomb of Alaxus. I explained that preparing for an expedition like this was an often overlooked part of the game, and that many of the more “old school” adventures would feature the players preparing to explore such sites in this way.

Gaining Experience

There has been some grumbling within my group over the use of several starter sets to create the campaign that we are playing set in the Vale. Mostly this is about the characters – they don’t seem to gain experience and grow, and it doesn’t seem as if their actions have any meaning to the campaign setting.

I can see where my players are coming from, the game has been going on for about a year, and in that time they have played three different sets of 1st level characters, often with the same composition of Fighter, Rogue, Cleric, Mage.

Admittedly, some of this has been because of interruptions in our gaming schedule – including a three month hiatus when Sian and I were unable due to having foreign house guests with us. But even so, I can see why they might be getting a little confused.

The point is that I wanted to combine several starter sets together, because of various reasons. I wanted to use Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon because of the tutorial nature of it’s adventure – ordinary villagers escaping from a wizard’s dungeon. I wanted to use Have and the Vale because it is a simple yet well designed tutorial setting. Finally, I wanted to use the 3rd edition D&D adventure game because I still consider 3.x to be the simplest system, but capable of easy customisation. Not only does this mean three different starter sets, but also meant gaming across three different editions, and that can be quite the challenge for players and GMs in it’s own right.

The problem with starter sets is that they focus on simple, low level play, as they are a teaser often to encourage groups to purchase the full rules and supplements. They typically feature the same four basic classes, as these all provide the basic functions which are deemed neccessary for a decent party for the relevent editions.

A significant issue is that the low-level focus means a low-level limit. The Basic D&D game set provided information for levels 1 to 3. The Easy to Master Revised D&D set provided information for levels 1 to 5. Some starter sets also decide that the pregenerated characters should be higher level, often 2 or 3, as this makes them less fragile and more heroic for newer plays. All of this equates to a small window of growth, within which to squeeze everything.

This doesn’t make it impossible though, especially when you add the fact that many sets often include extra characters. This can make it more confusing than just playing a single party, but it does allow for more adventures, and a better campaign storyline that focuses more on what happens during the adventures, than what happens with the PCs.

This doesn’t mean that the PCs won’t advance. They will, and it’s no secret that I am a big fan of the milestone system, if only because it saves the maths involved in trying to keep track of experience. This puts me in more control of how and when the characters advance.

Now, I know that my players would prefer to have just one (or two) characters that they can level up, because they can get more into the role, but that’s just one way of telling the story.

I do have a plan on how I want the story to progress, and the adventures are simple enough that there’s not a lot of branching to deal with. I will give the players some control – mainly, which PCs to use for which adventures, but with some requirements, because I know that without them, they will want to stick with the same PCs, without even taking into consideration the level window of the campaign.

As an added bonus, there’s plenty of PCs to use as a back up should things go wrong. It can be annoying to lose a favoured character, but with a back up, it’s not so vital that they have to be revived, and even then, restoring a character can become an adventure in it’s own right.

Ultimately, this may not be the type of game that my players are used to in Dungeons and Dragons, telling the type of stories that revolve around a single set of characters. Rather, it’s an ensemble cast telling the story of an area and it’s past. In addition, the game is telling a story of D&D through time, and how it has evolved.

But mostly, it’s me pulling the strings and tying everything together in a way that I hope my players will ultimately enjoy, that isn’t just about characters gaining levels and getting stronger…

Campaign Milestones

Following on from last week’s post, I figured that I could spend some time showing you what I have planned for the next couple of adventures. After all, with this plan in mind, I can work out the narrative and keep the campaign exciting.

It’s no secret that I am a fan of the milestone method of advancement. That is, I prefer to dole out experience levels rather than experience. This is particularly useful with systems like D20, where you have a relatively uniform progression, so individual character experience becomes much less important.

That said, this can become an issue when you have a staggered party, with a mix of levels, for whatever reason. So for that reason, whilst I typically plan a campaign and it’s adventures based on experience levels, I do still dole out the experience rewards as set amounts. This way, whilst I can control to some degree the rate that character’s level up, my players also have some degree of control over what characters they want to advance, aware that taking higher level characters may not see them advance as much as others would.

Of course, I am running a fairly non-standard campaign. Due to the fact that there are only two players in my game, I have instead opted to go with an approach that focuses more on the campaign narrative than on the player character and party narrative. In this way, rather than sticking with one party with the same characters, the players get to swap around characters between adventures, for a more sandbox approach.

Now, I could repeat myself over the background, the whys and wherefores of the campaign, my choice of using starter sets, and the order they go in, and so forth, but that would get boring pretty fast. Instead, I am going to look at outlining the campaign roadmap, and how it relates to character progression.

Using starter sets means that I can break the campaign down into discrete chunks, often with a different purpose for each chunk. After all, this isn’t just a storyline, but a teaching method of the game, and for a geek like me, also a chance to look back at some great nostalgic treats.

In the discussion on Starter Sets, we can see pretty much three such chunks:

  1. The Easy to Master Dungeons and Dragons Game Boxed Set (featuring Zanzer’s Dungeon).
  2. The Dungeons and Dragons Fast Play Series (featuring the Vale).
  3. The Dungeons and Dragons Adventure Game (featuring D&D 3.x/d20).

The first was a single, albeit rather long adventure, in which the basics of the game got taught. In this way, my players learned how to create characters, how to fight, and how to adventure. However, because it’s only a single dungeon adventure, there wasn’t any need to worry about experience advancement. The characters started at Level 1, and would remain Level 1 throughout. Having escaped, the party would return to town, where rather than advancing to Level 2, we would leave them and move onto the next chunk of the campaign.

The second chunk consists of a number of adventures in a basic setting, known as the Vale. Here, having learnt the basics of adventuring in Zanzer’s Dungeon, the players get to learn about what makes a campaign. It is here that the players get to start thinking about the basics of advancement, although in the somewhat more restricted Advanced Dungeons and Dragons 2nd Edition system, as key decisions like character generation were already done, but the players still get the thrill of advancement, as well as learning things like how to prepare for adventures.

The third chunk of the campaign also features a number of adventures. This time, these adventures are played using the 3rd Edition Dungeons and Dragons rules, which give the players much more freedom to adventure and advance, without overwhelming them with lots of possibilities. The adventures are still pretty basic, but there’s still that sense of accomplishment and learning, by the end of which, the players should be focused more on exploring options than worrying about what they can or cannot do.

After these three chunks, I have a treat for the players. In Zanzer’s Dungeon, a further adventure was teased – Stonefast. This is a partially stocked dungeon, which GMs can use to further practice their dungeon stocking techniques that they first learnt in the Easy to Master Dungeons and Dragons Game. However, instead of stocking merely five rooms, they get to stock over thirty. This makes an ideal reward for the players, as I intend to use Stonefast to tie up the majority of the campaign, as well as seed any further developments and adventures to come. After all, I can place whatever I want here, and with several “villains” having fled during the adventures, it’s a good time to settle scores before moving on to other pastures.

These chunks are the milestones in the campaign, and I have a few, larger, so-called chunks to work on later on. For example, I am considering long-term plans to have the characters explore Thunder Rift and the Known World of Mystera at a later point, which may or may not keep the characters at early levels of the game in various ways.

But what about experience, I hear you ask. Well, this is easy, as the road map basically involves planning out adventures. I am lucky, in a way, my players aren’t very proactive, so they don’t often decide that they want to strike out in new directions. Instead, they seem somewhat happy for me to provide the seeds of adventure for them to follow. As such, I know that they will basically follow any adventure given to them, and tend to enjoy it, without too much worry about things like character narratives.

For the second chunk, I am using the Fast Play adventures Wrath of the Minotaur and Eye of the Wyvern, as well as the three adventures in the Dungeons and Dragons Silver Anniversary Adventure Game which also takes place in the Vale. Now, both of the Fast Play adventures featured the same starter adventure, the Ruined Tower, which features four PCs, and then introduce another four additional PCs to choose from. These same PCs are also all featured in the Dungeons and Dragons Silver Anniversary Game, so carrying them over is pretty simple. That’s 8 PCs, or two different parties.

With this in mind, it’s simple enough to split these eight PCs into two groups. The plan is that one group will go on one of the adventures, whilst the other will go on the other. I will let my players choose which four PCs go on which adventure, of course, but they will need to think carefully, as there’s only a single cleric, and a single thief, amongst all 8 characters. As such, the players can’t neccessarily just take all their best characters on one adventure – to succeed, they must choose what characters they think will be suited to each adventure and play accordingly.

I intend to use Wrath of the Minotaur and Eye of the Wyvern as the first two adventures to choose from, although I am currently only going to only present the Wrath of the Minotaur adventure for consideration. Basically, whomever doesn’t go on Wrath of the Minotaur WILL go on the Eye of the Wyvern adventure instead. Characters completing either adventure should gain enough experience to advance to Level 2.

After this, the players will again be presented with one of two adventures from the Silver Anniversary game. Once again, anyone who doesn’t go on the first adventure will go on the second. Characters completing either adventure will advance to Level 3. With this, a final mission will be presented, and four of the characters can be chosen to attempt this, advancing to Level 4 should they succeed.

The overall aim here is to give the players choices without overwhelming them. So I am not going with saying “Here’s twenty eight characters, choose who to play.” But I am not also going with “Here’s one character you get to play with for the rest of your life.”

The simple fact is that I know my players, and I know that they will get overwhelmed with decision paralysis. Thus, I want to limit their decisions to those that are meaningful, whilst allowing them to impact on the campaign. It’s a chance for them to explore what they want to play, without feeling too tied down or overwhelmed with the burdens of character creation and character advancement right at the start of the game.

The aim of chunk two is to give them that, in the context of a basic campaign, so that they can get used to making more and more decisions, representing the various stages of the game. In the first chunk, the focus was on combat decisions, as they went from one encounter to the next. In the second chunk, I want them to start thinking about how to prepare for an adventure, to take on some degree of party management, and get to appreciate character advancement.

As for the characters that have gone before? As stated before, none of them are gone forever. They are still there, as back ups, ready for play if the players want to have them explore Stonefast when it comes to wrapping things up…

Rags to Ruins – The Ruined Tower Session Recap

Last week, we commenced the campaign after the christmas break, with our plucky players (Sian and Ouro) leading yet another bunch of newbies into adventure. Darkblade the Fighter and Niles the Rogue were both played by Ouro, whilst Elanna the Fighter and Thaddeus the Mage were played by Sian.

Amidst groans because this was yet another starting party from a starter set – this time, from the Fast Play series (and also, the Dungeons and Dragons Adventure Game released for it’s 25th Anniversary in 1999), we had a flash back to this new party meeting with the Patriarch, the political and spiritual leader of The Vale, and the town of Haven.

The mission was simple – the Patriarch had recieved reports of a Ruined Tower nearby, that possibly belonged to a powerful wizard that lived in the Vale some time ago. Whilst this peaked the interest of the Patrician, who was keen to find out more about the legacy of the Vale, startling rumours from farmers surrounding the ruins about half-eaten cattle required action, as the threat that some monster, if not the wizard himself, was in the ruins.

Thus, the party was to explore the Ruined Tower. The village could provide no reward, but the party could keep any treasure that they found. However, the Patriarch would pay handsomely for any books or other historical materials found and returned to him, out of his own pocket.

With that, we returned to the “action” as the party was about to explore the Ruined Tower. It was a broken shell, filled with rubble and debris, although it seemed that several rats had decided that the ruins made a good home for them, and leaped out at the adventurers.

Combat was joined, with Darkblade, Elanna, and Niles entering into the frey. Elanna boldy strided into melee, after throwing one of her many daggers at a rat, where she managed to prove that she was no peewee after all. Niles used his daggers and Darkblade fired his longbow, providing backup as Elanna dispatched these enemies.

Meanwhile, Thaddeus had decided that now was not the time to use his magic, and his limited combat abilities meant that he was better off remaining out of the chaos for the time being, as the others clearly had things in hand. After all, his magic may be needed for greater foes to come.

After the fight, the party regrouped and noticed that beyond the debris, there was a door heading into the cliff. There was more to these ruins than just one shattered tower after all. Niles opened the door and the party stared into darkness, as the only light into the way forward came from the sunlight behind them. Darkblade lit a torch, before passing it off to Thaddeus.

The corridor ahead was riddled with damp, as did the rotten door a short way ahead of them. Elanna rushed forward, but managed to step back just in time as part of the passage floor crumbled, and collapsed into the earth before her. A natural pit blocked the way, as water damage as managed to work underneath the flagstones and wear away the soft earth underneath. Luckily, the pit wasn’t that deep, and was easy to cross thanks to it’s rough walls.

On the other side, the party  was able to examine the rotten door further. There was a sign that said it was a Scriptorium, but further details couldn’t be gleaned, as the door crumbled away as soon as Niles got too close. Beyond, a dark room with timeworn desks could be seen, occupied by four figures in robes that revealed themselves to be skeletons armed with rusty triangular daggers.

Elanna and Darkblade rushed in, but this turned out to be a much tougher foe than they expected, as they were ill-prepared to fight the fleshless undead. Daggers and swords struggled to do damage enough to stop the skeletons, although both Elanna and Darkblade managed to make use of some of their impressive strength.

The boney creatures didn’t have the same issues, and whilst their weapons were rusty, they still managed to land some serious blows upon Darkblade, taking him out of the fight after three harrowing attacks. Hope seemed bleak, as Elanna was the only one with any healing, a potion of healing that held two doses, but she was too far away from Darkblade, who was struggling to stay alive as Niles covered him from the advancing undead.

Yet Elanna proved her worth as she fought her way closer to Darkblade, and then heroically leaped over Darkblade, pouring some of the potion of healing down his throat. It was a desperate action that would have left her open if Niles couldn’t hold off the remaining skeleton.

Once again, Thaddeus looked on, and decided that his help wasn’t needed. His magic was strong, but limited, and whilst the room was interesting, there was clearly more beyond that could prove a bigger threat.

Once again, the party regrouped, gathering both their own daggers, and the rusted weapons from the skeletons. The weapons were useless, but perhaps the design might hold some clues for the Patrician later. Meanwhile, the door leading beyond was much more solid and bound in iron, with a metal plate attached. One the plate was the symbol of a bull’s head. What could this mean?

Niles carefully examined the door, and then picked the lock. With a quiet click, the door was unlocked, and the party pushed it open. Beyond was a room with wall shelves full of books. This looked like what the Patrician was after – but the room too was occupied.

Before the party, two rotting corpses stood motionless, staring blankly ahead. Unfortunately, a third figure, a humanoid with decayed pointy teeth and purple flesh turned to greet them with an angry glare. “Kill them all!” the figure snarled, and the two corpses turned towards the party, undead vitality animating their torn flesh.

The party knew the score, and Elanna stood up to both zombies without hesitation, striving to protect the others. Thaddeus stepped forward into the doorway, knowing this was the time to unleash his power. A missile of pure energy streaked past the party, and hit the ghoul directly in the chest. The forceful blow wasn’t enough to kill the creature, but it did force the beast to drop the box it was holding.

The ghoul knew that this wasn’t a fight it could win, facing an armed adventuring party, and therefore decided to flee, opening a large stone slab at the back of the library revealing a passage beyond. Darkblade moved to try and kill the ghoul before he could escape, firing an arrow at the creature, whilst Elanna and Niles dealt with the corpses.

Although the arrow struck true, hitting the ghoul just above his thigh, it was not enough to kill the creature, which fled down the passage. Darkblade noted a glimmer of daylight at the end of the passage, and realised that having driven off the ghoul, he should help his comrades dispatch the remaining zombies rather than pursue the creature. Besides, the foul undead had dropped whatever treasure it was holding.

The zombies were easily dispatched after a few blows, and the party regrouped once again. Surely, this was the Library that the Patriarch was willing to pay so handsomely for, and with that, Thaddeus picked out a few choice books to return to the Patriarch, whilst Niles grabbed the small chest that the ghoul had been holding. It was time to return to town and get their reward.

The Patriarch greeted them warmly, eagerly wanting to hear their news, and his eyes lit up when the party told him of the library in the Ruined Tower. Thaddeus pulled out the books he had brought back, and the party showed them the strange daggers. With a wide smile, the Patriarch offered to pay everyone 400 gold pieces each as a reward for the books and the information for the Library. He also offered the party 20 gold for all four daggers. The party agreed, for this was a pretty good reward for a relatively simple mission.

It was then that Niles pulled out the small chest and placed it on the table. It hadn’t been opened yet, and Niles carefully picked the lock. Upon lifting a lid, they had discovered the Ghoul’s hoard: a handful of gleaming black pearls, a finely crafted dagger, a scroll of some kind, a vial of peppermint smelling green liquid, and a cloth bag.

The Patriarch’s eyes opened wide as he explained that black pearls were a vital ingredient for a spell to identify magical items, and that they were worth 100 gold each, that he would gladly pay for if they wanted. He also said that he knew such a spell, and would readily cast it for them to identify their treasure, if they were willing to provide either a black pearl or 100 gold to pay for a replacement.

Eager to divvy up their loot, as they reminded the Patriarch that he had said they could keep any treasure they found in the Ruined Tower, they decided to part with four black pearls, but to divide the rest between themselves, rather than sell them to the Patriarch.

With an understanding nod, the Patriarch examined their items. It seemed the the scroll contained three spells – magic missile, knock, and a powerful lightning bolt. Thaddeus claimed this as he was the only one who could use it. Next, the cloth bag turned out to be a bag of holding, a magical bag able to carry more treasure than a normal bag, without adding any extra weight. This went to Niles.

The dagger was discovered to be enchanted, making it much more deadly. Meanwhile, the liquid in the vial turned out to be a potion of extra healing, which could be used just like the one Elanna had used to save Darkblade. However, this one could be used to heal even more damage, or split into three doses, each the same strength as the one Elanna had. With this in mind, it was decided that Darkblade should have the potion, and Elanna would take the dagger.

All happy, the party left the Patrician’s office. It was time to rest and recover after a successful adventure, whilst reflect on what they had learnt…