Of Mice and Wandering Monsters

After the series of linked, unmapped rooms in Zanzer’s Dungeon, which the PCs explored in the last session, the complex really begins to open up for the party to explore as they seek their ultimate objective – a way to escape the dungeon. They find themselves in a corridor, which not only contains a door leading to a series of small rooms, but also their their first, most significant, junction.

The complex itself wraps around the centre section in two opposite directions – clockwise and anti-clockwise, both meeting up again together at the exit from Zanzer’s Dungeon, where Zanzer awaits them for his final stand.

Heading clockwise, the PCs get to go past a jail complex of individual cells, heading into an area of the dungeon that is “unstocked” – given to the GM (i.e. me) as an area to practice designing their own dungeons and adventures. Heading anti-clockwise, the PCs get to go through a guard post leading into the mining facility itself. After going through either area, the party comes to the final area where they will fight Zanzer for their freedom, and find a route to Stonefast, which they can explore later in the campaign as they explore the mysteries of The Vale.

This means that for this session, we have three main areas to develop. Firstly, there’s the side rooms, which are a series of three rooms that the PCs can explore for possible extra experience and loot, but ultimately lead them nowhere. Then we have the clockwise route, which will see the party go past room 23 – the Jailblock. Finally, we have the anti-clockwise route, which will see them go past room 29 – the Guard Post.

Wandering Monsters

One key feature in basic D&D, that would see various use throughout the various editions of the game, was the concept of wandering monsters. At certain points, often where there might be some expected movement by the inhabitants of the dungeon, the party has a chance to encounter wandering monsters each turn.

Players have a love-hate relationship with wandering monsters in the game, as they can be used to spice up otherwise bland areas of the dungeon, especially if the party are backtracking through an area they have previously explored. They can also be used to steer the party towards or away from certain areas, or by the GM to bring the players back into the game if the action starts to lag.

Unfortunately, for all the good uses of wandering monsters, they can often slow the game down if over used, and this often gets in the way of the story, especially if the PCs are heading towards an anticipated climactic encounter.

We only have a limited allotment for encounters per session, looking at between three to five encounters based on party actions and player energy. As such, it can seem like a waste to spend these encounters on wandering monsters, rather than exploring rooms and getting through the dungeon.

As such, as much as wandering monsters are a staple of Dungeons and Dragons, we should look towards making a compromise – I will aim to have a single wandering monster encounter per session. This gives me some flexibility to include an encounter to help better direct the flow of play, but not so much as to bog down the game and get in the way of exploring.

Making a List…

In the Easy to Master (Black Box) Dungeons and Dragon’s Game, the GM gets a tutorial through the use of Dragon Cards, explaining to them the rules and principles of play, as well as including the four parts of adventure Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon. The idea is that the GM reads the cards, which gives them just enough information to handle what is covered in that part of the adventure, and by the end of it, the GM will be running a full D&D game.

So far, we have covered the first three parts of the adventure, which has taught the GM about roleplaying, character creation, combat, and other rules like movement, encumbrance, and dungeon exploration. This involved a process of the GM learning to play using these rules first, and then effectively teaching the party how to play by those same rules.

After the third part, the remaining Dragon Cards focused more on teaching the GM about what happens between dungeons, as well as how to create their own dungeons, with greater reference to the rulebook that was included. This section would end with the fourth part of the adventure, where the GM could put some of what they had learnt into practice.

Of key significance here were the cards that taught about designing an adventure and stocking a dungeon. The Dragon Cards would go through this with two examples – first for Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon, and then once again with Stonefast.

The example for Escape from Zanzer’s Dungeon was mostly filled – after all, a lot of the most important decisions were already designed, and the majority of the dungeon was already stocked for play, following the tutorial provided. This included discussing how the major enemy of the dungeon, Zanzer Tem, was decided, how treasure was chosen and placed, and what features were included.

In Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon, there were only two sections left for the GM to work on to finish up the adventure – a series of five rooms (Rooms 24 to 28) that needed stocking, and creating a wandering monster list. It’s the latter task that we need to focus on now as the party emerges into the main complex.

Checking It Twice

To create a wandering monster list, the GM simply has to choose some monsters or other things that the party might encounter as they explore the dungeon. These should be creatures that fit the dungeon, and are inclined to roam about, moving from room. There only needs to be between six to ten entries, as this will provide enough variation for random encounters.

It’s recommended that the GM focus on humanoid encounters within Zanzer’s Dungeon, as these would be the guards that Zanzer uses within his mines. This is useful for us, as most of these creatures are simple encounters, and the party has already encountered several humanoids within the dungeon already. In fact, so far the party has encountered hobgoblins, goblins, kobolds, orcs, gnolls, and human guards, as well as a minotaur. These all make good encounters for our list.

In the rulebook, several other humanoids exist – bugbears, ogres, troglodytes, thouls, and trolls, among others. This gives us a big list to chose from, but not all of these are suitable as a wandering monster encounter for a 1st level party. For example, thouls paralyse like ghouls, and trolls regenerate, which may be too much for a low level party to handle by chance. Likewise, the party has already encountered Dimitri the minotaur, and this encounter might be undermined if minotaurs are common wandering encounters. Finally, as much as I fancy including troglodytes, they produce a stench that penalises other creatures in combat, and it seems that other humanoids might not want to cooperate with them.

Putting together a list of the remaining options, we have:

  • Hobgoblins
  • Goblins
  • Kobolds
  • Orcs
  • Gnolls
  • Human Guards
  • Bugbears
  • Ogres

This gives us a nice list of eight entries to choose from for our encounters. Now all we need to do is decide how many are encountered at once, and our wandering monster list is done.

In rulebook gives some wandering monster encounter tables to use as a reference. Looking at this, we see that the following are first level encounters:

  • 1d6 Goblins
  • 1d6 Hobgoblins
  • 2d6 Kobolds
  • 1d6 Orcs

We also see that 1d4 Gnolls are listed as a second level encounter, suitable for a higher level party. As such, we would probably want to reduce the die range by one step, to 1d3 Gnolls, to make it a first level encounter.

Looking at the third level table, we find 1d6 Bugbears and 1d3 Ogres listed as suitable encounters. These need to be reduced, and just as we did with the Gnolls above, we will reduce these by two die steps, giving us 1d3 Bugbears and 1 Ogre as suitable encounters.

Although human Guards aren’t listed, we can assume that 1d4 Guards counts as a suitable first level encounter. This gives us the following table with eight encounters:

  1. 1d6 Goblins
  2. 1d6 Hobgoblins
  3. 2d6 Kobolds
  4. 1d6 Orcs
  5. 1d3 Gnolls
  6. 1d3 Bugbears
  7. 1 Ogre
  8. 1d4 Guards

We could organise the table better, but if we use a 1d8 to choose the encounter, we have an equal chance of each, so it doesn’t really matter what order they are presented in.

This might seem a lot of work for a single encounter, but having designed this list, we can reuse it for future sessions in this dungeon, as well as if the PCs ever decide to return to this dungeon in the future.

Side Rooms

With the wandering monster list out of the way, it’s time to focus on the encounters for the next session. As discussed above, the core of these are the three side rooms, rooms 20 to 22, which give the PCs further opportunity for experience and loot.

The first of these, Room 20, is a dark room containing a glowing crystal ball and five sprites. It’s a relatively simple encounter, where the PCs are teased by the sprites, and they only attack if attacked first.

In the second side room, Room 21, there are 2 gnolls. This is a combat encounter, similar to other encounters with gnolls so far.

In the third room are four imprisoned gnomes. The gnomes promise a reward if freed. However, the PCs may fight the gnomes if they get greedy for more treasure.

Altogether, there’s really only a single encounter here – the Gnolls. The other two rooms have encounters that the PCs can easily bypass, so both can be considered a single encounter together, depending upon the PCs actions.

Decision Time

At the end of the corridor passing the siderooms, the PCs get to make a key decision as discussed above. This decision will most likely determine what direction the party travels in during the next sessions, as both routes lead to the exit.

Although the PCs can return to here and take the other route at any time, in order to limit the amount of work needed to do at once, it’s best if only the first encounter of each direction is detailed, and wandering monsters are used to steer the gameplay as needed. A good tactic here is to have the PCs encounter wandering monsters just before they progress into any area that hasn’t been developed yet – that’s through the double doors to Room 24 or leaving Room 29.

If the PCs head clockwise, they will pass through corridors that lead to Room 23 – the Jail Block. It contains eight cells, although only three are important. Cell A contains silvered weapons, which act as normal weapons but are useful for fighting the werewolf and other vulnerable creatures. Cell B contains two healing potions hidden under rags.

The most important feature is Cell G, who’s bars are made of solid silver. This is because the occupant is a werewolf, who can only be hit by silver weapons in wolf form. If the werewolf is released, then he can be used later returning in wolf form as a wandering monster encounter.

Altogether, the entire cell block counts as a single encounter, as the only combat is with the werewolf, which might not even take place until the party tries to leave the cell block, depending upon where they attempt to go. For example, if the PCs decide to head towards Room 24 after leaving, they might encounter the werewolf in wolf form bounding down the corridor towards them, whilst if they try to leave Room 29, the werewolf in wolf form might chase them after they finish with the encounter there.

Whatever the case, if the PCs head clockwise, they will find the doors to Room 24 stuck, as the rooms beyond will be detailed in a later session, and wandering monsters (or the werewolf) will be used to distract them until the end of the session.

If the party heads anti-clockwise, they will head into Room 29. This is a simple room where slaves from the cells are changed by guards before they head to and from work in the mine. There’s no encounter here, but the PCs should find manacles and cloaks to disguise themselves as miners.

If the PCs opt to press further in this direction, then they will find that the door leaving room 29 is stuck, and wandering monsters or the werewolf in wolf form will distract them from going any further. Wandering monsters may actually come through the door leaving Room 29, rather than from behind them. If the PCs are disguised as miners at this time, the wandering monsters may fall for the disguise, in which case they will attempt to lead the PCs towards room 23 and the cells within.

Room 29 doesn’t count as an encounter, so we really only have three encounters, with the fourth being a wandering monster encounter, and the fifth being in case the PCs decide to fight either the gnomes or the sprites.

When wrapping the session up, we should discuss where the party is heading next. Make a note of if they decide to move the stable, what they do with NPCs like Axel and Gorgo, and where they decide to rest. This will give us time work on what the PCs might encounter in the next session – if they are going to head clockwise, they will encounter the series of rooms that the GM gets to stock, whilst if they head anti-clockwise, they get to explore more of the mines, and even deal with Zanzer Tem as they finally discover the way to Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon!

Time For Dinner – Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon, Session 5

Finally got back to gaming after a few delays, and the party got off to a flying start. The planning for the session was covered here (and here). Picking up from where we left off, the group quickly recapped, and then went over what items they wanted from the storeroom we ended the session in. Pike took the platemail armour, Carok took the shield, and Dent picked up the thieves’ tools. The party pocketed the rations and the rope, and took a torch each.

Nugging was wary of the big bags of gold left on the floor, resting on the trapdoor, but the thought of leaving all that gold was too much for the party. So Nuggin thought of a plan – Dent would tie the rope around all the bags of gold, and then the party would leave the room, and use the rope to pull the bags in after them, so whatever trap was sure to go off wouldn’t affect them.

The plan went well, in a manner of speaking. Dent tied the rope around the bags, and then pulled the rope. Six of the bags remained attached to the rope as it left the room, but the other four came loose, spilling coins in a trail to the door. Dent was pretty pleased with himself, until he spotted why the bags were piled where they were – they covered a trapdoor in the floor, out from which slithered a massive rock python.

Dent hastily closed the door, and thinking that they were safe, went to examining the bags of gold, but their safety was short lived, as the rock python broke down the door and entered the room, hungry for another meal – none of the party figured out that the rock python had already eaten the lone wolf encountered in the previous session. The fight itself wasn’t long-lived though, as a few sturdy strikes from the party sent the snake packing, as it ran away back into it’s hidey hole in the storeroom.

The party pressed on, and soon come to the guard barracks, where they encountered a lacked door. In excitement, Dent rushed to pick the lock, but failed to notice the poisoned needle in the lock, and promptly fell asleep. The party had little choice but to wait for him to come round. When he did, Dent returned to picking the lock, and soon the door was opened, leading into a short dark corridor.

Dent lit a torch, and rushed into the corridor for a look. There were four doors, and Dent opened the first without hesitation. It led to a store closet, and Dent entered with his usual impetuousness. Unfortunately for Dent, the door closed behind him, and Dent found himself trapped in the room, as there was no way of opening the door from inside the room. Luckily for Dent, Pike followed into the dark corridor, and the only light came from under the door that Dent had entered. Pike opened the door and let the poor Dent out of what could have been his final tomb otherwise.

The party then opened a second door, this time chosen by Pike. Inside, they met Gorgo, who claimed to be Zanzer’s manservant. Moved by his plight, and only a little bit by the solid gold ball on a silver chain that was around Gorgo’s foot, they released the blind man from his shackles. Pike pocketed the ball and chain after releasing Gorgo, much to Axel’s obvious disappointment who was greedily eyeing up the riches.

Dent returned to the corridor and opened a third door, discovering four zombies in a dirty kitchen. He quickly rushed to close the door, leaving the creatures standing there, who didn’t appear to have noticed him.

Carok opened the final door in the short corridor, where they discovered Dimitri, a minotaur sitting at a small dining table. Dimitri invited the party to sit with him for dinner, which Carok, Pike, and Dent did. It was only when they did so that Dimitri revealed that they were to be the first course. Dimitri bellowed for the kitchen staff – the four zombies – to come and serve him, as he reared up and attacked with a mighty below.

The party found themselves attacked on two fronts – although Dimitri was cornered, the four zombies shuffled towards them from a door that joined to the kitchen. As Carok blocked the way, and prevented the door from opening, the Zombies proceeded to batter down the door first, giving the party time to take down Dimitri. The minotaur was a tough and fearsome opponent, but fell after the sustained attacks by Pike, Carok, and Dent. Unfortunately, this wasn’t quick enough for the party to prepare a proper defence against the zombies, and Carok fell under their initial attacks. Nuggin’s quick thinking, as he bodily dragged the fallen Carok out from the melee and fed him a healing potion meant that he was up and fighting once again, and the tide soon turned against the zombies.

As the fighting raged on, Axel backed up into Gorgo’s room and barricaded the door, refusing to join the fight whilst claiming that he was protecting the blind man. The session ended shortly after the fight, and a quick bout of looting, as the party found four more healing potions, and a bag of rubies. The party found the way to progress further in the dungeon, certain that they must be nearing their goal by now. But they have to decide what they are going to do with their fellow adventurers currently resting back in the armoury under the protection of Hector, as well as what they intend to do with Axel and Gorgo. However, Axel seems satisfied for now, after claiming TWO of the bags of gold as his share, with the second bag covering the PC’s debt towards him…

What the Vale?

Due to personal reasons, we have had to postpone the past few sessions of our game, so we haven’t dealt with anything that was planned in Going Off The Rails. So instead, I used the time to do some further planning on the campaign setting.

I started thinking beyond Zanzer’s Dungeon. The core foundation of the campaign, for now, is The Vale. This campaign area was used in a series of products aimed at getting new players into Dungeons and Dragons when TSR celebrated the silver anniversary of the game. TSR created a series of Fast Play products aimed at teaching the game and building up interest. The first of these products was a preview in Dragon magazine, where they explored the Ruined Tower, a small dungeon adventure that serves as an intro to both of the full adventure products – Wrath of the Minotaur and Eye of the Wyvern.

Further investigation, including looking at archived sources on the Trove website, and I discovered two more sources set in The Vale. The first of these was another Fast Play preview release called Crypt of the Smoke Dragon, which is sort of set into the Vale, but doesn’t feature the pre-generated characters from the other Fast Play games. The second of these was a full starter set that was released also as part of the silver anniversary, and featured three adventures in the Vale. The first two were set in the town of Haven, whilst the third is exploring a Dragon’s Lair in the Vale. A map of the Town of Haven, along with a write up for it, was also included.

Using these sources, I plotted a campaign outline as follows:

  1. Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon
  2. Crypt of the Smoke Dragon
  3. The Ruined Tower
  4. Under Town
  5. The Black Isle
  6. Wrath of the Minotaur
  7. Eye of the Wyvern
  8. The Dragon’s Lair

It’s a simple linear campaign outline, that is based more on when the pregenerated characters are introduced to the player. They will have the Patriarch as their patron, who will serve to direct their adventures around the Vale. The pregenerated characters will serve to bulk out their Stable – a pool of characters the players can choose from as their characters for an adventure.

From these adventures, I was able to create a map of the Vale for the PCs to explore. Although this campaign isn’t designed as a hex crawl, I still used a hex grid, and came up with the following:

I didn’t include any labels on the map, but I did include several features and trails to them. Although the main road stops at Haven in the south, I created paths that followed the routes of the two outdoor adventures (Eye of the Wyvern and The Dragon’s Lair). This was particularly important for Eye of the Wyvern, where the PCs get to travel to a place that serves as a second settlement in the Vale, because this would presumable be a fairly common route for travellers in the vale.

I placed Zanzer’s Dungeon in the mountains to the west, near the river. This allows a quick escape from the dungeon to the town of Haven when they leave the dungeon. I also placed Stonefast, the empty secondary dungeon in the Easy to Master (Black Box) Dungeons and Dragons game. Although I haven’t included Stonefast in the campaign, I figure that the trapdoor in Zanzer’s Dungeon will intrigue the players enough to get them to explore it at some time, even though it remains unstocked for now.

By including Stonefast on the campaign map, I noticed that I created a rough east-west cross route which the PCs might also want to explore, and could be expanded as needed in the future.

Looking to the future, I was thinking that the campaign might shift to Thunder Rift, which was the site for the majority of the revised Dungeons and Dragons campaign, which was heralded by the Easy to Master (Black Box) Dungeons and Dragons game. It may go from there to exploring the Known World and the Hollow World, also called Mystera, which was first explored in the basic D&D game upon which the Easy to Master (Black Box) Dungeons and Dragons game is based. This allows access to the BECMI series of adventures.

However, this is all far in the future, as I still plan to include adventures from the 3rd Edition beginners boxed set in the Vale, before we even consider moving on. I haven’t placed any of these yet, though, because it might take some time to complete the adventures already planned.

As well as the map of the Vale, I also created a number of maps for the dungeons that are to be explored. Here are some previews of them to whet some appetites.



Going Off The Rails

Finally, we have made it to Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon – Part 4. At this point, the tutorial nature of the New Easy to Master (Black Box) Dungeons and Dragons Game fades away, allowing the players to explore the rest of the dungeon as they decide, with optional side rooms and multiple paths to choose from. There are still some new tricks for the GM to learn, but for the main part, the players are now experiencing the full game as intended – at least that bit with the poster map!

Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon is accompanied by a poster map of Zanzer’s Dungeon, upon which the adventure is played. The rooms are all marked out, for the most part, and the central tutorial section is clearly cut off from the rest of the complex in a linear path to the cell within which the PCs started. Thus, there were some clear visual clues for the players to use as they progress.

There is one exception however, and this is a small complex of rooms (numbered Room 15 to 20) which is simply marked as a large square room with 5 tiles (25 ft.) to each side. This is a small area to allow the party to get used to one of the key skills in D&D – mapping the dungeon.

Many adventures would take place without the benefits of a poster map, and therefore the players would probably desire to start drawing a map of their own, both as an aid to exploring the dungeon, but also to note where the PCs are during complicated battles.

Luckily for us, we are using Roll20, and therefore it’s best practice to have the majority of all maps pre-drawn and ready, using the tools of the online tabletop to hide the map and reveal it as the PCs explore. As such, we will not be needing to use the mapping tutorial from Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon.

However, the encounters within Rooms 15 to 19 are still worthwhile to use, and this small complex gives the players their first chance to explore off the linear path they have experienced so far, with both siderooms and an alternative route to explore.

The objective of this small complex is to escape via Room 19, which leads out into the main dungeon complex. This can be achieved by heading straight into Room 19 from Room 15, or they can detour through Room 17. Rooms 16 and 18 are optional side rooms that can be explored as well.

It’s also worth noting that because of issues with the last session, we still have the final encounter from Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon Part 3 – the chase with the Rock Python from Room 12 through Rooms 13 and 14. The planning for this encounter can be found in the previous planning encounter.

We are currently looking at running four encounters per session, so if we consider the Rock Python encounter as being a single encounter, that leaves us three encounters to work with – which is just enough to cover the main encounters in Rooms 15 to 19.

There are two main features in Room 15, so it’s not really much of an encounter in itself. The door to Room 15 (from Room 14) is locked and trapped, and was also covered in the final half of Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon Part 3. The party will still have to deal with this door, but it can be combined with the encounter for Room 15.

Room 15 itself is dark, so for the first time, the PCs will need to light a torch to see. Upon lighting a torch, the PCs will find that they are confronted with four doors to choose from. The PCs are free to choose their route from here, but it’s worth pointing out that the party may become overwhelmed if they decide to open all the doors up at once.

Room 16 is a simple closet with an insidious trap – the door leading to Room 16 is a special one-way door that cannot be opened from inside Room 16. Once the last PC enters the room, the door springs shut, trapping them within. Anyone holding the door open must succeed at DC 18 Strength check to prevent the door from closing, although the PCs may decide to spike the door open. The PCs may use the knock spell on the scroll within the room to escape. They may also attempt to break down the door (DC 23, hardness 5, 20 hp).

If the PCs cannot escape, the players may opt to create a new party from the stable to rescue them, or if Axel is still around, to use a DC 20 Charisma check to get him to open the door from the outside and let them out. It’s worth noting that Axel will use this position of power to extort more treasure from the players, and for ever 250 gp of treasure they offer Axel, they get a +1 bonus in trying to convince him to release them.

Room 17 is an optional route to leaving the complex. Within sits Dimitri the Minotaur, who has 24 hit points.

Room 18 is a sideroom, containing Gorgo the blind man servant. Gorgo has 32 hit points. It’s worth noting that Gorgo’s golden ball applies a -2 penalty to Dexterity, with a corresponding -1 penalty to AC and Reflex saving throws.

Room 19 is the exit of this small complex, leading into the main complex. Here stand four zombies, each of which have 14 hit points each.

Although these rooms are light on details, each of these encounters are likely to result in either combat (Rooms 17 and 19), or in negotiation (Room 18), and as such are going to take some time to resolve. This gives us a total of three encounters, which combined with the Rock Python encounter gives us our target of four encounters per session. Room 16 is a devious trap, but as an optional side encounter, can be easily skipped.

Who’s Afraid of the Big Bad Wolf? – Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon Part 3(b)

Following on from our last session, we continued with our party’s attempts to escape from Zanzer’s Dungeon. You can find the planning for the session here. Unfortunately, some personal issues resulted in a slower pace of play this time, so we failed to reach the end of the planned session in time. This was compounded further by player mistakes and over-cautiousness, that saw the game slow to a crawl for most of the session.

Ouro opted to swap out Hector the cleric for a new party member, this time opting to create a mage with Nuggin. There weren’t too many choices to be made for Nuggin, as mages cannot wear armour, and can only use daggers and staves in combat. This meant that Nuggin was only able to pick up a dagger on his way to the rest of the party.

Once joined with the party, Nuggin examined the suspected magic items that the party had found so far, particularly the books and the stick. He quickly identified the books as a type of spellbook, each with a single spell. Rather than memorising a spell, however, Nuggin tried using the stick, certain that it was a magic wand of some type, and discovered that it was a wand of secret door detection. Unfortunately, in activating the wand, the secret door to room 11 was revealed, from beyond which a low growl could be heard.

Nuggin fled the room, unprepared for any sort of conflict, leaving Axel and Dent to cover the room with their bows. Dent tried firing through the doorway, but only hit a wall, as the cowardly wolf in the room hung back behind the wall, safe from arrow fire. Dent fired another shot, also ineffective, as the wolf refused to leave it’s safety.

Dent passed through the secret door to see what the problem was, and realised that the wolf was, in fact, prevented from escaping the small room, which was essentially a tiny closet. A brief scuffle saw the wolf lose it’s nerve and cower in fear after finally being hit, leaving it open to a couple more shots from Dent trying to put it out of it’s misery, but failing to kill the cowering beast.

Whilst this was going on, Pike grabbed one of the strange books and threw it at Nuggin, who had moved to the rear of the party. Pike had assumed that Nuggin could cast a spell direct from the spellbook, unaware of the long amounts of meditation and memorization a mage needs to prepare their spells. Nuggin failed to catch the book, which sailed past him into greasy pit behind the party.

Eventually, Pike moved into the closet to find out what was happening, and upon hearing the pitiful whining of the wolf, opened the closet door enough for the wolf to escape, which it did so at first opportunity. Pike then closed the door, and returned to the magic room. Dent followed him having found another stick and a pair of heavy leather gloves up on the closet shelves.

The party decided that Nuggin needed to have time to memorise a spell before proceeding. Nuggin recovered the spellbook from the pit with the help of the rest of the party, and Nuggin decided to take the time to memorise sleep, with the entire party having learnt about rushing ahead without letting the mage memorise any spells.

After eight hours, the party decided  to bravely enter room 12. They were somewhat confused by the fact that there was only one other door leaving the room, yet the wolf had vanished, leaving only a few spots of blood on the floor.

The room itself seemed like some sort of storage dump for items and treasure, including nearly 6,000 gold pieces in ten bags heaped in the middle of the floor. There were other items stacked amongst the shelves, including more weapons and armour.

Concerned that the gold was some kind of trap, the party were hesitant to touch anything in the room, especially given the disappearance of the wolf. They noticed that the gold seemed to be placed over some sort of wooden flooring, possibly a trapdoor, in such a way that it would be impossible to even examine it without moving the gold.

It is here that the session ended, as player fatigue and personal issues got in the way, and the game had crawled to a halt. They hadn’t quite made it to the end of part 3 of Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon, but that’s not too much of a problem, given the continued linear nature of the dungeon so far, as the remaining encounters can be included in the planning for next session.