More Toys For The Boys

I didn’t really do much that was noteworthy in terms of planning last session, because sometimes, the party just go slower than expected, or the adventure is designed to take place over multiple sessions. It’s quite interesting to see the difference between a one-shot “five-room” dungeon adventure, and a normal multi-session adventure in terms of scale of planning. God forbid that I create a mega-dungeon for my players!

That said, having covered the party’s preparations to explore the Tomb of Alaxus in the previous session, I did spend some time updating the Weapons and Armour tables with prices, so that my players could consider upgrading their equipment between adventures. After all, they might decide that the need something a bit more beefy for their encounters in due course.

Both the Weapons and Armour lists hadn’t been updated since the tutorial part of Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon saw the party of escapees find their first equipment after defeating Jerj. This was just after the players chose the classes of each character, which was needed to define their starting proficiencies, and therefore what weapons and armour they could actually use. This would see Fighters end up as absolute tanks, whilst demonstrating just how weak early Mages were.

It was nice to be able to add some new toys to the mix, although I believe that apart from a few more daggers for Thaddeus, the party were more interested in exploring their new recruits with further adventures. Seeing as I hadn’t done much else this week, I figured that I would show off the updated Armour and Weapons lists, as well as the new Equipment list. Don’t worry so much about the prices, D&D economy evolved over time…

Armour

The full updated Armour list is shown below:

Armour Price Proficiency AC Bonus
Padded Armour 4 gp Light Armour +1
Leather Armour 5 gp Light Armour +2
Ring Mail 100 gp Light Armour +3
Scale Mail 120 gp Medium Armour +4
Chain Mail 75 gp Medium Armour +5
Banded Mail 200 gp Heavy Armour +6
Splint Mail 80 gp Heavy Armour +6
Plate Mail 600 gp Heavy Armour +8
Shield 10 gp Shield +1

The entries that have been shown in italics are the new entries from Wrath of the Minotaur. The adventure added a range of new Armour from AD&D 2nd Edition, some of which didn’t neccessarily make it into 3.x or later editions, but I felt like including it.

Padded Armour is form of armour made from layers of padded clothing, slightly thicker than normal wear. It’s a simple and cheap armour, but has equally poor AC bonus to go with it.

I always thought that Ring Mail was a type of Chain Mail, that was made from rings of metal joined together in a much looser weave than Chain Mail. Turns out, I was wrong. Ring Mail is actually a form of Leather Armour that has rings of metal embedded into it. This makes it a variant form of Studded Leather Armour, so I used the AC for Studded Leather to represent Ring Mail.

Scale Mail is similar to Chainmail, except that rather than chain links woven together for protection, small steel plates are linked together, forming protection like the scales of a fish.

Splint Mail and Banded Mail are both forms of Chain Mail with sheets of plate metal on top, giving it better protection. However, with Banded Mail, the sheets go horizonally around the wearer in bands, whilst in Splint Mail, they go in vertical strips down over the body of the wearer from the shoulders. Unlike Plate Mail, these metal strips do not overlap in any way, so don’t provide the same degree of protection.

There are some anomalies here that I am working on. For example, with Leather Armour only costing 1 gp more than Padded Armour, why would anybody choose, let alone pay for, Padded Armour. Why is Scale Mail less protective than Chain Mail, yet of greater cost. And why would anyone choose Banded Mail over Splint Mail if they both give the same protection? I think a lot of these issues will be answered at a later time when more aspects of the game come into play.

Weapons

The full updated Weapons list is shown below:

Weapon Price Type Proficiency Damage
Knife 5 sp Melee Simple 1d4 Slashing
Dagger 2 gp Melee/Thrown Simple 1d4 Piercing
Club Melee Simple 1d4 Bludgeoning
Mace 8 gp Melee Simple 1d6 Bludgeoning
Quarterstaff Melee Simple 1d6 Bludgeoning
Spear 1 gp Melee Simple 1d6 Piercing
Morningstar 10 gp Melee Simple 1d8 Bludgeoning
Shortsword 10 gp Melee Martial 1d6 Piercing
Handaxe 1 gp Melee/Thrown Martial 1d6 Slashing
Flail 15 gp Melee Martial 1d8 Bludgeoning
Warhammer 2 gp Melee Martial 1d8 Bludgeoning
Battleaxe 5 gp Melee Martial 1d8 Slashing
Broadsword 10 gp Melee Martial 1d8 Slashing
Longsword 15 gp Melee Martial 1d8 Slashing
Halberd 10 gp Melee Martial 1d10 Slashing
Greataxe 20 gp Melee Martial 1d12 Slashing
Greatsword 50 gp Melee Martial 2d6 Slashing
Sling Ranged Simple 1d4 Bludgeoning
Light Crossbow 35 gp Ranged Simple 1d6 Piercing
Shortbow 30 gp Ranged Martial 1d6 Piercing
Longbow 75 gp Ranged Martial 1d8 Piercing

As above, the entries in italics are new entries that have been added or amended from Wrath of the Minotaur. These entries help round out some of the missing gaps from the weapons list, including several from AD&D 2nd Edition which didn’t make it into later editions.

The Knife is a cheap, single-bladed dagger. More of a tool than a weapon, it’s a cheap option for melee. It’s single blade means that it’s not balanced for throwing, and causes slashing, rather than piercing, damage.

The Quarterstaff was available in D&D, but never featured in the adventure Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon, and therefore was omitted from the original list. It’s essentially a long, two-handed stick, which is an improvement over the single-handed Club.

The Morningstar is basically a Mace with a heftier, and spikier, head. It’s still essentially a bashing weapon, but causes greater damage than the Mace.

The Flail is essentially a Mace that has a length of sturdy chain between the head and the haft of the weapon. This allows for greater damage when used, but requires more training than a Mace or a Morningstar does.

In D&D, the Battleaxe is a two-handed axe, that does more damage than the Handaxe. In AD&D 2nd Edition and later editions, the Battleaxe becomes a sturdier one-handed axe that cannot be thrown in combat, unlike the Handaxe. The two-handed axe weapon becomes the Greataxe. This gives those who prefer axes a viable, more powerful, weapon choice that sits between the Handaxe and Greataxe.

The Broadsword is a sword with a wider blade. The removal of the Broadsword in D&D 3.x has been somewhat contentious, as the Broadsword is an iconic weapon in fantasy games. Longswords were often seen as weapons for more agile fighters, with slightly greater reach and parrying ability. From 3.x, the Broadsword was classed as a Longsword, with no differences between the two. As such, I included it again simply because I am a fan of the humble broadsword in my games…

Equipment

Finally, here’s the new Equipment list to examine:

Item Price
Backpack 2 gp
Belt Pouch 1 gp
Blanket 3 sp
Bucket 5 sp
Chain, Light (per foot) 3 gp
Chest, Small 2 gp
Chest, Large 1 gp
Candle 1 cp
Chalk 1 cp
Firewood (per fire) 1 cp
Flint and Steel 5 sp
Glass Bottle 10 gp
Holy Symbol 25 gp
Holy Water (per vial) 25 gp
Ladder (10′) 5 cp
Lantern 12 gp
Map Case 8 cp
Mirror 10 gp
Mule 8 gp
Oil (per flask) 6 cp
Paper (per sheet) 2 gp
Parchment (per sheet) 1 gp
Piton 3 cp
Rations (per week) 3 gp
Rope (per 50 feet) 1 gp
Sack, Large 2 sp
Sack, Small 5 cp
Thieves’ Tools 30 gp
Shovel 5 sp
Wine Skin (per Skin) 2 sp

Not exactly mind-blowing, but this has been the mainstay of adventuring equipment since the first days of D&D. Although the 10-foot Pole got dropped to the wayside in favour of the 10-foot Ladder. Still, if you really need a 10-foot Pole or two, you can always break the Ladder in half. Of course, do it wrong and you will end up with two 5-foot Ladders…

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Da' Vane

I am the designer and writer behind the D-Jumpers.com website.

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