A Touch of Class

Following on from the success of the last session, it’s time to plan for the next session, which will cover Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon – Part Two. The PCs have finally escaped their prison cell, and now get to explore more of the dungeon as they seek a way out. At the same time, the players will get to explore and further develop their characters, as they decide their classes, and gather armour and weapons that they can use to help in their escape.

Losing the Training Wheels

It’s important to understand that from now on, the gloves are off, and the PCs will be able to die. This can be quite jarring for newer players as they are still exploring the game and developing their characters.

Even though the PCs will still get quite a few advantages as they continue to learn the game, and we slowly develop the system we are using, death becomes a real possibility, but the most important thing is to keep the game moving.

Key to this is to make use of the party stable. There are a number of additional characters that the players can use to continue their adventure, chosen from those that the players decided against in the last session.

None of these characters have been developed beyond their descriptions, so players will have to bring such characters up to the same standard as the current PCs.

Luckily, for now this information is just the character’s ability scores, which were assigned in the previous session. As we progress through this session, further details may also need to be chosen, such as classes, armour and weapons.

Even though death is possible, it should be noted that we can use d20 rules for death and dying, where characters are disabled and dying at 0 hit points or less, and they will only die after taking an additional 25% of damage (rounding up). This gives the PCs time to try and save their characters should they fall in combat.

Although death is a possibility, it is not the aim of the encounters in this part of the adventure, as Zanzer wants to take the party prisoner. As such, creatures will not target unconscious and dying characters.

Should the active party be defeated, the players can use their back up characters to continue their adventures. It is entirely possible that if their previous party was defeated, but not killed, that their new active party may be able to rescue them.

Even if the the entire stable is defeated, as long as some of the PCs survived, they are likely to wake up back in their cell, ready to escape again. Additional prisoners may be present if the players need extra characters if too many were accidentally killed.

Escape from Zanzer’s Dungeon – Part Two

The second part of Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon features four key scenes, as follows:

  • Assigning Classes
  • Armoured Guards
  • Melee Weapons
  • Ranged Combat

Looking at the experiences from our previous session, four scenes should be enough for a single session.

Assigning Classes

At the end of Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon Part One, the PCs had managed to escape their cell and explore the first few rooms in the complex. They had fought a few combats, and were left in a room where they found several heaped suits of armour.

The PCs were still bare bones at this point, having a basic description and assigned ability scores. This provides the core of a basic character, but didn’t include probably the most important part of a Player Character – their Class.

A class is a sort of template for the abilities that the PC has. It defined what they are good at, and ultimately what role they will have in an adventuring party. In early editions of Dungeons and Dragons, a class not only defined what they can do now, but also how they would develop in the future. So choosing a class for your character was even more important in these versions of the game.

In later editions of D&D, multiclassing became an option, where the PCs were able to choose to take more than one class as they develop, giving characters much more flexibility and versatility. Even so, classes still provide the core of the PC’s abilities, and is still a significant decision for a player.

In basic D&D, there were seven basic classes. Four of these were for human characters – Fighter, Cleric, Thief, and Magic User. The remaining three were for demihumans – the non-human options for PCs. In basic D&D, each demihuman race was it’s own class, with their own abilities. These were the Dwarf, Elf, and Halfling.

In other versions of D&D, racial choices were seperate from classes, so you can be a Dwarf Fighter, Elf Magic User, or Halfling Thief.

We have already made the decision that all of our PCs will be human, so we don’t have to worry about choosing racial options at this time.

As for classes, there are so many options to chose from, that we would benefit from focusing on the four classes provided by basic D&D, even though we would need to update these to d20 standards.

The four classes in basic D&D cover the four main themes in D&D, and in fantasy adventuring in general. You have the fighter to fight and protect the party, the cleric to heal the party, the thief is a sneaky skill user and trap finder, and the magic user deals with magic. This is diverse enough for the players to choose from, but not too many to overwhelm them with options.

A significant aspect of each class is what armour and weapons the players can use. Fighters can use almost all weapons and armour, but lack any other skills. Meanwhile, the magic user has a very limited range of weapons, and cannot use armour at all, but this is compensated with the fact that they can use powerful magic spells.

This gives us the following classes:

  • Fighter.
  • Cleric.
  • Rogue (renamed Thief).
  • Mage (renamed Magic User).

At this time, magic is going to be discovered in the next part of Escape From Zanzer’s Dungeon, so any Mage character is going to be somewhat under powered compared to other classes until they get to that point.

In basic D&D, the Cleric is a warrior priest that fights undead, and therefore they only gain access to magic when they gain additional power. This means such divine magic doesn’t have to be considered right now, and the Cleric has enough fighting skill that they can survive without needing magic right away.

The Thief had a number of special abilities to compensate for a reduction in fighting ability. These involved a mixture of sneakiness, and with the ability to find traps and open locks. Although these abilities were fixed in early editions of D&D, d20 would present the Rogue as a Thief class replacement, that would become a much more flexible skill-based character.

For now, we can disregard a lot of the abilities of these classes, and instead focus on the armour and weapons they can use. Discovering and fighting with these options is the focus of the remaining three scenes of this part of the adventure.

Axel will choose to become a Fighter. This gives him access to all weapons and armour in the upcoming scenes.

Armoured Guards

At the end of the previous part of the adventure, the party found a number of suits of armour. With each character having chosen a class, they now know what sort of armour they are able to use.

In d20, armour is broken down into three categories: Light, Medium, and Heavy. Each class is given the ability to use categories and types of armour. In addition, classes also define if they can use shields.

These armour proficiencies are as follows:

  • Fighter: Heavy Armour, Medium Armour, Light Armour, and Shields.
  • Cleric: Medium Armour, Light Armour, and Shields.
  • Rogue: Light Armour only.
  • Mage: No armour proficiencies.

The pile of armour includes enough armour for each PC to choose a single suit of armour to wear. They can choose either a suit of Leather Armour or Chainmail Armour.

Having chosen their armour, the PCs can then determine their Armour Class (AC) – the target number opponents need to score in order to hit them. This is worked out in the d20 rules as follows:

  • Armour Class = 10 + Armour Bonus + Dexterity Bonus.

The armour bonus for the types of armour found in the pile is as follows:

  • Leather Armour: Light Armour (+2 Armour Bonus)
  • Chainmail Armour: Medium Armour (+5 Armour Bonus)

Axel will choose to take a suit of chainmail armour. His new Armour Class will be 15.

Having chosen their armour, and updated their characters, a group of hobgoblins enter the room, and a combat ensues. These hobgoblins are armoured, so their Armour Class is 13. However, they do not have weapons, and deal 1d4 points of damage that knocks the PCs unconscious rather than kills them.

Melee Weapons

Entering the next room, the PCs discover racks of melee weapons. This is an opportunity for the PCs to arm themselves.

Weapons are split into Simple and Martial categories. Each class is proficient with weapons as follows:

  • Fighter: All Simple and Martial weapons.
  • Cleric: All Simple and Martial weapons. Clerics are limited to weapons that cause bludgeoning damage only.
  • Rogue: All Simple Weapons, plus the short sword and rapier.
  • Mage: Dagger and Quarterstaff.

Looking through the weapon racks, the PCs can find the following weapons:

  • Dagger: Simple Weapon (1d4 piercing damage)
  • Club: Simple Weapon (1d4 bludgeoning damage)
  • Mace: Simple Weapon (1d6 bludgeoning damage)
  • Spear: Simple Weapon (1d6 piercing damage)
  • Shortsword: Martial Weapon (1d6 piercing damage)
  • Handaxe: Martial Weapon (1d6 slashing damage)
  • Warhammer: Martial Weapon (1d8 bludgeoning damage)
  • Longsword: Martial Weapon (1d8 slashing damage)
  • Halberd: Martial Weapon (1d10 slashing damage)*
  • Greataxe: Martial Weapon (1d8 slashing damage)*
  • Greatsword: Martial Weapon (2d6 slashing damage)*

*These weapons require two hands to use, and cannot be used with a shield.

The PCs get to apply their Strength modifier to damage rolls with melee weapons. Axel will take a longsword to use, and will cause 1d8+2 slashing damage in melee combat.

Once the PCs have chosen a melee weapon each, the PCs hear deep gutteral voices coming from beyond the door. In one round, gnolls will enter the room and attack the party.

The gnolls are AC 14, and cause 1d6+1 bludgeoning damage in melee combat. As they are using weapons, there is a risk of dying in this combat.

Ranged Combat

When the PCs enter the next room, they find a rack of missile weapons and ammunition, as well as an archery target. This is a good time for any PC that wants a missile weapon to take one.

Just like melee weapons, ranged weapons are split into Simple and Martial categories. Each class is proficient in missile weapons as follows:

  • Fighter: All Simple and Martial Weapons.
  • Cleric: All Simple Weapons. Clerics are limited to weapons that cause bludgeoning damage only.
  • Rogue: All Simple Weapons, and Shortbows.
  • Mage: Cannot use missile weapons.

Searching through the racks, the PCs can find the following missile weapons:

  • Sling: Simple Weapon (1d4 bludgeoning damage)
  • Light Crossbow: Simple Weapon (1d6 piercing damage)*
  • Shortbow: Martial Weapon (1d6 piercing damage)**
  • Longbow: Martial Weapon (1d8 piercing damage)**

*Light crossbows require two hands to reload, and take an action to reload.

**These missile weapons require two hands to use.

The PCs also find ammunition to go with these weapons, and can take one quiver of 10 arrows, one case of 10 crossbow bolts, or one pouch of 10 sling bullets each.

In addition to using ranged weapons, melee weapons can be thrown in combat as well. A dagger, spear, or handaxe can be thrown to cause their normal damage.

Axel will take a longbow and a quiver of 10 arrows, and thus can make ranged attacks that cause 1d8 piercing damage.

When the PCs leave the room, they encounter a goblin and two orcs, who engage in ranged combat along the hallway.

The use of ranged weapons in this combat introduces another step in the combat sequence, between moving and melee fighting. During this stage, all those characters using ranged weapons get to attack.

They have an AC of 10, although one orc gains a +4 bonus to AC (for a total of 14) when using a doorway for cover. The PCs can gain a similar +4 bonus to AC if they use the doorway of the room they just left for cover in a similar manner.

Neither the goblin nor the orcs will engage the PCs in melee. The goblin will flee if engaged in melee, but the orcs will stay and fight.

Upon defeating the goblin and the orcs, the party can investigate the nearby room, after which this part of the adventure will end, in preparation for the next part of the adventure, which will be the last part of the tutorial for the PCs. In this final part, they will learn about traps, saving throws, magic, and other abilities that make up being a PC.

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Da' Vane

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