“Once More Into the Breach, Dear Friends…”

charge!It has been a long time since I actually did any work. Too long, in fact. It has been little under five months since I even sat down at my keyboard and tried putting down my ideas into anything resembling usefulness.

As usual, after such a long period of absence, dealing with the changes in my life (and their have been a few), my first thought is to archive all my previous work, look at where I was going wrong, and see what I can do to make things better.

Looking back, I realise that I have a terrible “boom and bust” pattern of work, which has resulted in a long line of epic, incomplete projects. I tend to push the scope to far, force myself to work too hard, and then burn out, leaving for long periods of time, all before I attempt to restart the cycle.

In short, my cycle is as follows:

  1. Decide to Start A New Project
  2. Plan the Scope Too Wide
  3. Work Myself Too Hard
  4. Burn Myself Out
  5. Abandon My Project
  6. Re-Evaluate and Repeat

6d35d2f831001e67820b92803928a8b0Although I am aware of this cycle, I have never actually tried to focus on looking on the flaws in this cycle, and seeing how it affects my working patterns. By trying to put this into a website article, I can hopefully help process my thinking better, and realise ways in which I can start to break this cycle to become more productive, improving both my workload and my health, physically and mentally.

This cycle is a common cycle for many people, and tackling it will hopefully help myself and others recognise the pattern and be able to nip it in the bud before it takes root. It is all too easy to accept things as being outside of your control – and sometimes, they are – but only by looking at it can you be certain.

Study9Even then, the key is to look at what IS under your control, and change those factors accordingly. This is a type of thinking that is important for games designers and games players alike. Nobody ever won a game of chess by giving up because they couldn’t move their Rook on the first turn. Instead, they asked themselves if moving their Rook was important to their strategy, and if so, what would it take to allow them to move their Rook.

As such, over the next few weeks, I will go over my cycle step by step, discussing WHY I tend to take such steps, what the flaws with each step are, and what can be improved about each step. This is not a cycle for success – but it IS a cycle of good intentions, and hopefully by critically examining those intentions, a far better system can be created.

Next week, I will be looking at the first step – Deciding to Start a New Project.

Until then, Stay AWESOME!